As discussed in my previous post, large format cameras have movements to adjust the camera.  Field cameras have limited movement compared to the heavier and bulkier view cameras. Although, they still have movements that a photographer can use while taking an image with the camera.  For more about View vs Field cameras read here Field Vs View Cameras.

In this post I am going to focus on a movement called “Rise”.

Rise

Is where you raise the front or back of the camera to change the position of the objects in your composition (what you see in the ground-glass).  Rise can be very convenient to help adjust where a specific object is in the frame of your image.

Field Camera in Neutral Position

Field Camera in Full Rise Position

To adjust the filed camera from neutral to a rise position or back to a neutral position on the front of the camera just loosen the knob on the side near the lens board and raise or lower it S(Knob on the right seen here).

Raising the back of the field camera is a little more tricky, but can be done.  First you need to lower the front of the camera.  Then tilt the back of the camera back to the plain it was on.  Next loosen the second knob near the lens board and tilt the lens back so it is on the same plain as before.  (This could also be considered “fall” movement)

The rise movement is limited, but works very well. It is extremely useful when composing an image.  Using a large format camera forces you to slow down and think about things before taking the image.  Film is expensive, so slowing down a little is recommended.

Don’t forget to look at the images on my site in the galleries starting at: https://mjvphoto.com/the-art/.  Hopefully you find some of them inspirational for your own photography adventures, or maybe you find an image you want to call your own.

While I share this journey with everyone on the internet, I will attempt to keep explanations simple and easy to understand.  If you have any comments, question, or feedback please leave them in the comment section.  I look forward to hearing from people.